SpeedTest++ is another unofficial speedtest.net client cli interface that supports the new (undocumented) raw TCP protocol for better accuracy. We have packaged this software for multiple architectures so you don't dont have to compile it manually on your systems.

Features
  • Best server discovery based on speed and distance from you.
  • Line type discovery to select the best test profile based on your line speed.
  • Aggressive multi-threading program in order to saturate your bandwidth quickly.
  • Test supported: Ping / Jitter / Download speed / Upload speed / Packet loss (UDP).
  • Provide a URL to the speedtest.net share results image using option --share
Install
This assumes you have our repository added.
apt install sf-speedtest
Usage

root@server:~# SpeedTest -h
SpeedTest++ version 1.14
Speedtest.net command line interface
Info: https://github.com/taganaka/SpeedTest
Author: Francesco Laurita 

Usage: SpeedTest  [--latency] [--quality] [--download] [--upload] [--share] [--help]
      [--test-server host:port] [--output verbose|text|json]
optional arguments:
  --help                      Show this message and exit
  --latency                   Perform latency test only
  --quality                   Perform quality test only. It includes latency test
  --download                  Perform download test only. It includes latency test
  --upload                    Perform upload test only. It includes latency test
  --share                     Generate and provide a URL to the speedtest.net share results image
  --test-server host:port     Run speed test against a specific server
  --quality-server host:port  Run line quality test against a specific server
  --output verbose|text|json  Set output type. Default: verbose
Example

root@server:~# SpeedTest
SpeedTest++ version 1.14
Speedtest.net command line interface
Info: https://github.com/taganaka/SpeedTest
Author: Francesco Laurita 

IP: 127.0.0.1 ( Verizon Fios ) Location: [37.1302, -76.3802]
Finding fastest server... 100 Servers online
............
Server: Washington, DC speedtest.washington-dc.xiber.net:8080 by Xiber LLC (203.884 km from you): 10 ms
Ping: 10 ms.
Jitter: 0 ms.
Determine line type (2) ........................
Fiber / Lan line type detected: profile selected fiber

Testing download speed (32) ...........................................................................
Download: 743.84 Mbit/s
Testing upload speed (12) .............................................................................
Upload: 957.39 Mbit/s
Nebula
This package contains the Nebula binaries, a default config file, and a service file for systemd to simplify the deployment of Nebula. Nebula is a scalable overlay networking tool with a focus on performance, simplicity and security. It lets you seamlessly connect computers anywhere in the world. Nebula is portable, and runs on Linux, OSX, Windows, iOS, and Android. It can be used to connect a small number of computers, but is also able to connect tens of thousands of computers. Nebula incorporates a number of existing concepts like encryption, security groups, certificates, and tunneling, and each of those individual pieces existed before Nebula in various forms. What makes Nebula different to existing offerings is that it brings all of these ideas together, resulting in a sum that is greater than its individual parts. You can read more about Nebula here. You can also join the NebulaOSS Slack group here.

Technical Overview
Nebula is a mutually authenticated peer-to-peer software defined network based on the Noise Protocol Framework. Nebula uses certificates to assert a node's IP address, name, and membership within user-defined groups. Nebula's user-defined groups allow for provider agnostic traffic filtering between nodes. Discovery nodes allow individual peers to find each other and optionally use UDP hole punching to establish connections from behind most firewalls or NATs. Users can move data between nodes in any number of cloud service providers, datacenters, and endpoints, without needing to maintain a particular addressing scheme. Nebula uses elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and AES-256-GCM in its default configuration. Nebula was created to provide a mechanism for groups hosts to communicate securely, even across the internet, while enabling expressive firewall definitions similar in style to cloud security groups.

Getting started

1. Install the serverforge nebula package.
This assumes you have our repository added.
apt install sf-nebula

2. (Optional, but you really should..) At least one discovery node with a routable IP address, which we call a lighthouse.
Nebula lighthouses allow nodes to find each other, anywhere in the world. A lighthouse is the only node in a Nebula network whose IP should not change. Running a lighthouse requires very few compute resources, and you can easily use the least expensive option from a cloud hosting provider. If you're not sure which provider to use, a number of us have used $5/mo DigitalOcean droplets as lighthouses. Once you have launched an instance, ensure that Nebula udp traffic (default port udp/4242) can reach it over the internet.

3. A Nebula certificate authority, which will be the root of trust for a particular Nebula network.
nebula-cert ca -name "Myorganization, Inc"

This will create files named ca.key and ca.cert in the current directory. The ca.key file is the most sensitive file you'll create, because it is the key used to sign the certificates for individual nebula nodes/hosts. Please store this file somewhere safe, preferably with strong encryption.

4. Nebula host keys and certificates generated from that certificate authority.
This assumes you have four nodes, named lighthouse1, laptop, server1, host3. You can name the nodes any way you'd like, including FQDN. You'll also need to choose IP addresses and the associated subnet. In this example, we are creating a nebula network that will use 192.168.100.x/24 as its network range. This example also demonstrates nebula groups, which can later be used to define traffic rules in a nebula network.
nebula-cert sign -name "lighthouse1" -ip "192.168.100.1/24"
nebula-cert sign -name "laptop" -ip "192.168.100.2/24" -groups "laptop,home,ssh"
nebula-cert sign -name "server1" -ip "192.168.100.9/24" -groups "servers"
nebula-cert sign -name "host3" -ip "192.168.100.10/24"

5. Configuring nodes.
Open /etc/nebula/config.yml in your preferred editor.
On the lighthouse node, you'll need to ensure am_lighthouse: true is set.
On the individual hosts, ensure the lighthouse is defined properly in the static_host_map section, and is added to the lighthouse hosts section.

6. Copy nebula credentials to each host.
For each host copy {host}.crt, and {host}.key from step 4 to the corresponding node.

7. Run nebula on each host.
service nebula start